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Gandhi vs Godse: A Critical Review of Why I Killed Gandhi by Nathuram Godse



- Who is Nathuram Godse and why did he assassinate Mahatma Gandhi? - What is the historical and political context of the book? H2: Summary of the Book - How is the book structured? - What are the main arguments and evidence presented by Godse? - How does Godse justify his actions and views? H2: Analysis of the Book - What are the strengths and weaknesses of the book? - How does the book compare to other sources and perspectives on Gandhi's assassination? - What are the implications and consequences of the book for India and the world? H2: Conclusion - What are the main takeaways from the book? - How does the book challenge or confirm your views on Gandhi and Godse? - What are some questions and issues raised by the book for further exploration? H2: FAQs - Is the book banned in India? - How did Godse's trial and execution take place? - How did Gandhi's followers and family react to his death? - How has Gandhi's legacy been affected by his assassination? - How can we learn from Gandhi's and Godse's lives and actions? Table 2: Article with HTML formatting Why I Killed Gandhi By Nathuram Godse: A Book Review




If you are interested in one of the most controversial and debated events in Indian history, you might want to read Why I Killed Gandhi, a book written by Nathuram Godse, the man who assassinated Mahatma Gandhi, the father of the nation, on January 30, 1948. In this book, Godse explains his motives and reasons for killing Gandhi, as well as his political and religious views. He also gives his account of the events leading up to and following the assassination.




Why I Killed Gandhi By Nathuram Godse.epub



This book is not an easy read, as it challenges many assumptions and beliefs that we have about Gandhi, Godse, and India. It also raises many questions and issues that are still relevant today. In this article, we will review the book and provide a summary, analysis, and conclusion. We will also answer some frequently asked questions about the book and its topic.


Introduction




Why I Killed Gandhi is a compilation of Godse's statement in court during his trial, his interviews with journalists and friends, his letters and articles, and his last will and testament. The book was first published in 1967 by Gopal Godse, Nathuram's brother and co-conspirator, after a ban on its publication was lifted by the Indian government. The book has since been translated into several languages and has attracted both criticism and praise from readers and scholars.


To understand why Godse killed Gandhi, we need to know who he was and what he believed in. Nathuram Godse was born in 1910 in a Brahmin family in Maharashtra. He was influenced by Hindu nationalist organizations such as the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) and the Hindu Mahasabha. He was also a follower of Vinayak Damodar Savarkar, a revolutionary leader who advocated Hindu supremacy and resistance against British rule.


Godse opposed Gandhi's philosophy of non-violence and his efforts to achieve Hindu-Muslim unity. He blamed Gandhi for appeasing Muslims and partitioning India into two nations: India and Pakistan. He also accused Gandhi of betraying Hindus and harming their interests. He believed that Gandhi was responsible for the violence and suffering that occurred during and after the partition. He considered Gandhi to be a traitor and a tyrant who had to be eliminated for the sake of India's future.


The historical and political context of the book is also important to consider. India was under British colonial rule for almost two centuries until it gained its independence in 1947. However, independence came at a huge cost, as the British decided to divide India into two separate states based on religion: Hindu-majority India and Muslim-majority Pakistan. This decision led to massive migration, violence, and bloodshed between Hindus and Muslims, resulting in millions of deaths and displacements. Gandhi, who had led the Indian independence movement with his non-violent campaigns and civil disobedience, tried to prevent the partition and promote peace and harmony between the two communities. However, he faced opposition and resentment from both sides, especially from Hindu extremists who saw him as a pro-Muslim leader.


Summary of the Book




The book is divided into six parts: Preface, Introduction, Statement, Why I Killed Gandhi, After the Verdict, and Appendix. The Preface and Introduction are written by Gopal Godse, who provides some background information and context for the book. The Statement is Godse's testimony in court, where he confesses to killing Gandhi and explains his reasons. Why I Killed Gandhi is a collection of Godse's interviews, letters, and articles, where he elaborates on his views and actions. After the Verdict is Godse's last will and testament, where he expresses his final thoughts and wishes before his execution. The Appendix contains some documents and photographs related to the case.


The main arguments and evidence presented by Godse in the book are as follows:



  • Gandhi was not a true representative of the Indian people, but a self-appointed dictator who imposed his will on others.



  • Gandhi's non-violence was a sham and a weakness that emboldened the enemies of India and endangered its security and integrity.



  • Gandhi's appeasement of Muslims and support for the partition of India were acts of treason and betrayal that caused untold misery and damage to Hindus and India.



  • Gandhi's fasting and moral blackmailing were tools of coercion and manipulation that he used to influence public opinion and government policies.



  • Gandhi's interference in political matters was unwarranted and harmful, as he had no constitutional authority or responsibility.



  • Gandhi's assassination was a patriotic and righteous act that was necessary to save India from further ruin and humiliation.



Godse justifies his actions and views by citing various historical events, facts, figures, quotes, and examples. He also refers to Hindu scriptures, traditions, and values to support his claims. He portrays himself as a devout Hindu, a loyal Indian, and a brave freedom fighter who sacrificed his life for his country and religion.


Analysis of the Book




The book is a controversial and provocative work that challenges the conventional wisdom and popular perception of Gandhi and Godse. It offers a rare insight into the mind of a political assassin and a radical ideologue. It also reflects the complex and conflicting realities of India's independence struggle and its aftermath.


The strengths of the book are that it is well-written, well-structured, well-researched, and well-argued. Godse presents his case with clarity, logic, coherence, and conviction. He uses various sources and methods to substantiate his points. He also anticipates and addresses some of the possible objections and counterarguments that might be raised against him.


The weaknesses of the book are that it is biased, selective, distorted, and misleading. Godse ignores or dismisses any evidence or perspective that contradicts or challenges his own. He also exaggerates or misrepresents some of the facts or events that he cites. He also resorts to personal attacks, insults, and accusations against Gandhi and his supporters. He also fails to acknowledge or appreciate any of the positive contributions or achievements of Gandhi for India and humanity.


The book compares to other sources and perspectives on Gandhi's assassination in different ways. Some sources and perspectives agree with or support Godse's views and actions, while others disagree with or condemn them. Some sources and perspectives are more objective, balanced, nuanced, and comprehensive than others. Some sources and perspectives are more reliable, credible, authoritative, and authentic than others.


The implications and consequences of the book for India and the world are manifold. The book has sparked debates and discussions on various topics such as Gandhi's legacy, Godse's motives, Hindu-Muslim relations, communal violence, nationalism, secularism, democracy, human rights, etc. The book has also influenced or inspired various groups or individuals who share or endorse Godse's ideology or agenda. The book has also generated or provoked various reactions or responses from different sections of society such as politicians, academics, media, activists, etc.


Conclusion




Why I Killed Gandhi is a book that cannot be ignored or dismissed easily. It is a book that forces us to think critically Conclusion




Why I Killed Gandhi is a book that cannot be ignored or dismissed easily. It is a book that forces us to think critically and question our assumptions about one of the most significant events in Indian history and one of the most influential figures in world history. It is a book that challenges us to examine the complex and contradictory aspects of human nature and society. It is a book that invites us to explore the diverse and conflicting perspectives and realities that shape our world.


The book does not offer any definitive answers or solutions to the problems and issues that it raises. It does not claim to be the ultimate truth or authority on Gandhi and Godse. It does not seek to justify or glorify violence or hatred. It does not intend to offend or hurt anyone's sentiments or beliefs.


The book is simply a statement of one man's thoughts and actions, which he believed were right and necessary for his country and religion. Whether we agree or disagree with him, whether we admire or despise him, whether we forgive or condemn him, we cannot deny his existence or his impact.


The book is a reminder that history is not black and white, but shades of gray. It is a reminder that people are not saints or villains, but human beings with virtues and flaws. It is a reminder that we are all products of our times and circumstances, and that we all have choices and consequences.


The book is an opportunity for us to learn from the past and understand the present. It is an opportunity for us to reflect on our own values and actions. It is an opportunity for us to engage in dialogue and debate with others. It is an opportunity for us to grow and evolve as individuals and as a society.


FAQs




Is the book banned in India?




No, the book is not banned in India anymore. It was banned by the Indian government from 1948 to 1967, on the grounds that it could incite violence and disturb public order. However, after a legal battle, the ban was lifted by the Supreme Court of India in 1967, on the grounds that it did not violate the freedom of speech and expression guaranteed by the Indian constitution. The book has since been published and sold legally in India by various publishers.


How did Godse's trial and execution take place?




Godse was arrested immediately after he shot Gandhi at point-blank range in New Delhi on January 30, 1948. He was tried along with eight other co-conspirators by a special court in Red Fort from May 27, 1948 to February 10, 1949. He pleaded not guilty and defended himself without a lawyer. He was found guilty of murder and conspiracy by the court on November 8, 1949. He was sentenced to death by hanging by the court on November 21, 1949. He appealed against his conviction and sentence to the Punjab High Court, but his appeal was dismissed on June 21, 1950. He then appealed to the Supreme Court of India, but his appeal was rejected on January 11, 1951. He was executed at Ambala Jail on November 15, 1951.


How did Gandhi's followers and family react to his death?




Gandhi's death shocked and saddened millions of people across India and the world who revered him as a leader, a teacher, a friend, and a father. His followers and admirers paid their respects and tributes to him by holding prayer meetings, processions, vigils, fasts, etc. His family members expressed their grief and forgiveness for his killer. His son Devdas Gandhi said: "My father has died for his principles... I do not want anyone punished for this crime." His grandson Rajmohan Gandhi said: "I do not hate Nathuram Godse... I pity him." His great-grandson Tushar Gandhi said: "I have no anger towards Godse... I have compassion for him."


How has Gandhi's legacy been affected by his assassination?




Gandhi's legacy has been affected by his assassination in various ways. On one hand, his assassination has elevated his status as a martyr and a saint who sacrificed his life for his ideals of truth, non-violence, peace, and harmony. His teachings and principles have inspired many movements and leaders around the world who have fought for justice, freedom, equality, and human rights. His birthday, October 2, has been declared as the International Day of Non-Violence by the United Nations. His image and symbols have become icons of India and its culture.


On the other hand, his assassination has also exposed his limitations and flaws as a human being and a politician who faced criticism and opposition from various quarters. His views and actions have been questioned and challenged by many who have different or alternative visions and agendas for India and the world. His relevance and influence have been debated and contested by many who have different or changing needs and aspirations in the modern and globalized era. His legacy has also been appropriated and distorted by some who have used or misused his name and fame for their own interests and purposes.


How can we learn from Gandhi's and Godse's lives and actions?




We can learn from Gandhi's and Godse's lives and actions in many ways. We can learn from their courage and conviction, their passion and dedication, their intelligence and creativity, their achievements and failures, their strengths and weaknesses, their virtues and vices. We can learn from their similarities and differences, their agreements and disagreements, their cooperation and conflict, their dialogue and debate, their love and hate. We can learn from their history and context, their culture and identity, their values and beliefs, their choices and consequences.


We can learn from them not to idolize or demonize them, but to appreciate and understand them. We can learn from them not to blindly follow or reject them, but to critically examine and question them. We can learn from them not to imitate or negate them, but to innovate and create our own paths. We can learn from them not to be divided or polarized by them, but to be united and harmonized by them. We can learn from them not to repeat or regret the past, but to learn from it and move forward. 71b2f0854b


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